Don’t Touch My Hair and Don’t Discriminate Because of It Either: New York City Bans Racial Discrimination Based on Hair

Photo Credit: The NappStar Signature Style, Nappstar, https://nappstarrocks.com/.

By: Lindsey Phillips

Research and Writing Editor, American Journal of Trial Advocacy

            On December 19, 2018, a black high school student athlete was given an ultimatum: He could either cut his dreadlocks or forfeit his wrestling match.[1] Right before his match, Andrew Johnson was told by white referee Alan Maloney that neither his hair nor headgear was in compliance with New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association rules and regulations and that he would have to cut his hair immediately if he wanted to compete in his match.[2] Continue reading Don’t Touch My Hair and Don’t Discriminate Because of It Either: New York City Bans Racial Discrimination Based on Hair

Antitrust and Amateurism in Sports: Are Scholarships “Enough” to Compensate Collegiate Athletes?

Photo Credit: http://footballscoop.com/news/nike-adidas-or-ua-who-wears-what-in-fbs/

By: Jacey G. Mann 

Committee Chair, American Journal of Trial Advocacy

           This conversation has been circulating for years: Should collegiate athletes be paid for their services and for the use of their likeness, or are they already compensated enough? Historically, the courts have refused to get involved in such cases. This refusal may be related to personal biases with particular athletes or teams; Continue reading Antitrust and Amateurism in Sports: Are Scholarships “Enough” to Compensate Collegiate Athletes?

Permitless Carry: The Rapid Expansion of Concealed Carry across America

Photo credit: https://www.canva.com/photos/misc/MADGxzuSiLs-black-and-gray-semi-automatic-pistol-near-holster/

By: Bobby McNeill

Member, American Journal of Trial Advocacy

On March 11, 2019, the state of Kentucky became the 16th state to enact legislation implementing permitless carry, also known as “constitutional carry.”[1] Kentucky’s legislation imposes no formal application process, requiring only that a person seeking to carry a concealed firearm be 21 years of age and “otherwise able to lawfully possess a firearm.”[2] This legislation represents a growing trend in which many states are scaling back their regulation of the concealed carry of firearms. Typically, under constitutional carry laws, those wishing to conceal and carry a firearm may do so without submitting an application, undergoing a background check, obtaining a permit, or taking any mandatory training courses. Continue reading Permitless Carry: The Rapid Expansion of Concealed Carry across America

Litigation Watch in the Wake of Hurricane Michael

Photo Credit: Brandon Miller and Brandon Giggs, Michael the Strongest Hurricane to Hit the Continental US since Andrew, CNN (Oct. 11, 2018; 9.46 am) https://www.cnn.com/2018/10/09/weather/hurricane-michael-stats-superlatives-wxc-trnd/index.html.

By: Stephanie Smith

Member, American Journal of Trial Advocacy

Hurricane Michael made its way up the 14th Judicial Circuit on October 10, 2018.[1] This storm was the first Category 4 hurricane to make landfall in Florida’s Panhandle since 1851.[2] Top winds reached 155 mph.[3] Additionally, this was the third most intense hurricane to make landfall in the U.S. recorded history based on central pressure at 919 millibars minimum pressure.[4] To say the effects were devastating is an understatement; there were at least 72 fatalities, 57 of those in the United States.[5] Records show the storm had a high-water storm surge of 9 to 14 feet from Mexico Beach through the Apalachee Bay.[6] Total economic losses are estimated at approximately $25 billion.[7] These include privately insured wind and storm surge damage to residential, commercial, and industrial properties and automobiles.[8] Approximately a million customers in Florida, Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina lost power.[9] Many community members went without power or internet for two months. Continue reading Litigation Watch in the Wake of Hurricane Michael